All Posts by Jason Berube

About the Author

Jason Berube is an Associate at Insight Financial Strategists. Jason has more than 10 years of experience in financial services. He focuses on helping business owners and entrepreneurs.

Nov 26

8 Reasons you need a Business Valuation

By Jason Berube | Financial Planning

8 Reasons for a Business Valuation

Why you need a Valuation

If you value your business, you should know the value of your business. Every business owner should have an up-to-date business valuation wherever you are in your business’s lifecycle. It is important to know the value of your business sooner rather than later. For a variety of reasons, owners like you will want to have an ongoing understanding of where you stand.  In this post, I will be describing eight of the most common reasons for valuing ongoing businesses, the different valuation methods, and advice for future planning. 

1. Measuring Your Company’s Growth A business valuation delivers a calculated benchmark for comparing your annual growth. Specifically, a valuation report details areas for improvement and what is having a negative impact on your business, such as unstable cash flow, poor systems and procedures and key staff dependencies. Correcting these negative impacts can often translate into opportunities for business and valuation growth.

2. Selling your Business – This is one of the most common reasons for needing a valuation. Knowing your business’ true value and how to increase its Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) is crucial if you’re planning to sell (as EBIT is a critical factor in valuation). Much like using a valuation to measure your business’ growth, in the case of preparing for a sale you can use the valuation to identify areas for improvement and strategically implement developments to improve your business’ value by the time you plan to sell. Even if you want to sell only a percentage of your company, to get a partner, for example, an owner will need to know the value of the interest being transferred.

What is Earnings Before Interest and Taxes (EBIT)? In accounting and finance, EBIT  is a measure of a company’s profit that includes all income and expenses (operating and non-operating) except interest expenses and income tax expenses.

3. Attracting Investment Opportunities – You never know when an attractive opportunity will present itself. A valuation can be like your business’s resume for potential investors. It provides a snapshot of your business performance in the current economic climate. If you are seeking investors, annual valuations are essential.

4. Planning for expansion – When using a business valuation to measure your business’ growth, you might also decide that it’s the right time to expand your business.  An annual valuation provides an accurate performance benchmark and can make it easier to obtain funding from lenders and financial institutions. Having completed business valuations regularly can help you plan strategically and grow at the right time. 

5. Retirement PlanningMany business owners put their heart and soul (not to mention their life savings) into their business, with the hope that it will one day provide them with a retirement nest egg. If your long-term goal is to retire comfortably on the proceeds of the sale of your company, you need to be prepared.  A periodic update of the value of your company can help you determine if you are on track, and if you are not, what corrective measures to implement.

6. Implementing an EXIT strategy – Every exit plan should align with the owner’s business and personal goals. You have worked a lifetime to build your business into a profitable, well-run operation. A successful exit from a business takes considerable planning. Annual business valuations create a ‘starting point’ for the planning process. No matter what exit strategy you choose (merger/acquisition, sale to employees, etc.), you will need an accurate insight into the value of your share of the business. Regular business valuations will provide a clear picture of your business’s financial position at all times, and help you to achieve the best possible outcome when it is time to ‘exit’.

7. Litigation – If the Principal/Owner of the business is involved in legal proceedings such as a divorce or other lawsuit, the business may need to be valued as part of a property settlement. Divorce and legal disputes can sometimes be difficult topics to discuss. By implementing regular business valuations you’ll have an up-to-date financial record of your business assets which can be useful in legal proceedings such as a divorce or an audit investigation with a government agency.

8. Insurance coverage – Buy-sell arrangements between heirs of the owners’ estate will often include a life insurance requirement so that funds are available in the event of a co-owner’s death. The other co-owners are paid a lump sum benefit, which is then used to buy out the interest of the deceased’s surviving family members. An up-to-date business valuation is vital for this agreement. Insurance companies will ask for it, as your family’s/estate will be paid according to your share of the business value upon your death.

Three Approaches of a Business Valuation

Did you know that there is more than one approach to valuing your business?

There are several business valuation methods. The three most common types of business valuation are the Cost Approach, the Income Approach, and the Market Approach. While methods under each approach rely upon compatible sets of economic principles, the procedural and mathematical details of each business valuation method may differ considerably. 

Businesses are unique and putting a price on a company is complex. Cost, income, and market data must all be considered in order to form an opinion of value. 

The Cost Approach looks at how much it would cost to reconstruct or replace your company (or certain assets that are part of it). When applied to the valuation of owners’ or stockholders’ equity, the cost approach requires a restatement of the balance sheet that substitutes the fair market values of assets and liabilities for their book or depreciated values.

The Income Approach looks at the present value of the future economic benefits of your company. That future is then discounted at a rate commensurate with alternative investments of similar quality and risk.

The Market Approach measures the value of your company, or its assets, by comparing it to similar companies that have been sold or offered for sale. This information is generally compiled from statistics for comparable companies. Where the price represents a majority interest, the higher value is recognized and reflected in a higher price or a premium paid. However, the value of a closely-held company or its stock must reflect its relative illiquidity compared to publicly traded companies. A discount, or a reduction in the indicated marketable value, is made for this factor.

Planning for Your Future

Just like a medical checkup, business valuations should be done regularly since your business value can fluctuate widely depending on market conditions, competition, and financial performance. With so many reasons for knowing the value of your company, having an annually updated company valuation has become a best practice. A good business person knows their position and options at all times so they can make well-informed decisions.

A business is an important asset with very different characteristics from most other financial assets. Handling it correctly to maximize your net worth starts with periodic valuations. It also takes a wealth manager with experience catering to the needs of small business owners.

 

 

Aug 06

What to Expect Financially When Expecting

By Jason Berube | Financial Planning

What to Expect Financially When Expecting

Recently two of my closest friends and their wives became expecting parents. Of the two couples, one is expecting for the very first time. This very happy news inspired me to write this post to share my experiences as both a parent and a financial planner.  I would like to share my insights with becoming a parent for the very first time and getting a chance to understand and become competent at the financial aspects of parenting. 

Going down the path to parenthood, a thrilling moment in a relationship is quickly followed by the sobering realization of the costs involved in raising a child.

Many people receive help from family, friends and baby showers in accumulating the initial items needed such as furniture, baby equipment, and newborn clothes. This assistance may ease some of the immediate financial burdens but the ongoing cost of diapers, food, toys, and childcare can be a staggering expense.

What is less apparent at first is that non-child related expenses may be reduced. Many parents stay home more to take care of the baby, which means they have less time to go out and spend money on restaurants, bars, entertainment, and travel!

I am often asked what is the biggest financial expense that new parents should anticipate. I have found from my own experience is that most parents’ budgets will adapt to accommodate the new needs and replace old ways of spending. 

If you are a new or expecting parent, here are some suggestions on how you can take action now to prepare your financial life for your new way of life.

Set Up An Online Automatic Savings Account

The best way to prepare for increased expenses is to start making monthly contributions, before the baby arrives, to a savings account dedicated to baby-related costs. When goal-setting, it is often a good idea to establish different savings accounts for each goal like a vacation, buying a new house or, in this instance, saving for the ongoing cost of providing for a child. Having separate accounts can be a great way to keep track of how you organize your money. For example, if you have two different checking accounts, they can each have a different name, such as “Baby’s Expenses” and “Mom’s Mad Money” – or whatever you want! Putting aside money each month will benefit you in two ways. It gives you a chance to get use to the bigger cash outflows from your checking account and it also provides you with a nice cash cushion for baby-related expenses that you may have overlooked.

Create A Budget

Once you have children, finances have a way of becoming more complex.  That can be compounded by the fact that there is less time to keep track of everything.

New parents should consider creating a budget to keep their finances on track. One way is to create a “reverse budget”. It simply helps you to figure out how much you need to save, makes those savings automatic and then allows you to spend the remaining amount of money as you please. This process emphasizes using a regular and ongoing savings method instead of manual expense tracking, (a big plus when unexpected baby expenses arise). Once a reverse budget is set up, the entire thing is automated. 

From a financial planning perspective, a reverse budget forces you to write out your short- and long-term goals, which may be different now that a little one is on the way. And, you can use the same tool for other goals such as vacation or retirement.

Get Basic Estate Documents

Estate planning is a frequently overlooked task. Nonetheless, it remains very important for new parents to complete. There are five estate planning documents you should consider regardless of your age, health and wealth:

    1. Will
    2. Durable power of attorney
    3. Advanced medical directives
    4. Letter of instruction (LOI)
    5. Living trust (or revocable trust)

Creating a will is the most important step in an estate plan because it distributes your property and assets as you wish after death. Even more importantly, a will names legal guardians for your children in case both parents pass away while the children are still minors. 

Without a will that names a guardian for your children, the state you reside in will determine it for you.  That may not align with your wishes and creates needless anxiety.

Although, the other items in the list above are beyond the scope of this post, expecting parents should pay attention and review them, with a professional if you need to.

Figure Out Childcare Now

Whether you want to send your kids to daycare, hire a nanny, get help from grandparents or stay at home yourself, you need to get a plan in place soon.

The average cost of center-based daycare in the United States is $11,666 per year ($972 a month), but prices range from $3,582 to $18,773 a year ($300 to $1,564 monthly), according to the National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies (NACCRRA).

Most daycare centers require a non-refundable deposit. If you’re planning on using daycare, you should make a deposit at your daycare of choice as soon as possible!!!

Daycare slots will fill up quickly, so even registering for daycare just a few months before your due date can still leave you on a waiting list.

Hiring a nanny is not easy either. Finding someone you can trust, afford and fit in your schedule can be tricky. It is a little more difficult to secure a nanny as far in advance as a daycare center, but it is never too soon to begin looking so you can familiarize yourself with the important qualities and nuances of these relationships.

Long Term

It’s easy to remain focused on the joy (and anxieties) of the present. However, don’t forget the long term: although you may be overwhelmed by the excitement of a new addition to the family, you still have to steer your growing family into financial security for the long term.  

A new baby on the way is a great opportunity to check your long term financial plan. A bit like checking the air in your tires before a long trip. What to do for college savings.  How to prioritize retirement savings and investment. Dealing with the mortgage and other debt. And many other questions.

Consider Hiring A Financial Planner

If you’re feeling concerned about all the financial details involved in raising a child, just know that you’re going to do great! You’re planning ahead and getting prepared now, which will go a long way once your baby arrives.

But if you’re still worried, now may be the time to hire a financial planner, preferably a fee-only fiduciary. Hiring a professional frees up your time to do the other things you love most in life – including focusing on your growing family.

It can also help alleviate any stress your finances may cause because a really good financial planner will work with you to get your entire financial house in order and help you keep it that way forever.