Tag Archives for " financial planning "

Jun 17

Start an Emergency Fund

By Chris Chen CFP | Divorce Planning , Financial Planning

Start an Emergency Fund

This week I wrote the following short piece for the Boston Globe:

 

Many people have trouble putting together an emergency fund. After all, there is always something else to spend money on! These are often small items, small fees and small purchases that go unnoticed. However, they add up. What if you could limit your purchasing of these small items, and put your extra cash into a rainy day fund instead?

Here are some ideas:

1. Consider giving up your daily Dunkin’ Donuts or Starbucks habit. At $3.05, a cappuccino may not seem like a lot, but one every 251 working days in the year adds to $765. What small expenses do you incur every day that adds up?

2. AT&T and Verizon will charge you $199.99 for the new iPhone5 or the newer Samsung Galaxy 4 with a two year contract. The truth is most of us want the new hot phones and their fancy features. How long will these phones stay “hot”?

3. Pack your lunch: a sandwich or a salad at Panera will set you back $9 a day, or $2,259 a year.

4. Carpooling is great. Biking to work is better: It will not just save you gas, it will make you healthy too. Have you tried Boston Bikes yet?

 

http://www.boston.com/business/personal-finance/2013/06/14/raining-pouring-how-start-saving/0h0ktD2nYBSVEZ6ILO6nxM/story.html?pg=2

Simon Abrams on Unsplash.com
Jun 13

Working into Retirement

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Working into Retirement

The Great Recession has many older Americans considering the prospects of going back to work after retirement or staying in the workforce past their normal retirement age. But working after retirement age is not a new necessity. According to the Social Security Administration, more than 30% of individuals between the ages of 70 and 74 reported income from earnings in 2010, the latest year data are available. Among a younger age group, those between 65 and 69, nearly 49% had income from a job.

Some remain employed for personal reasons, such as a desire for stimulation and social contact; others still want a regular paycheck. Whatever the reason, the decision to continue working into your senior years could potentially have a positive impact on your financial future.

Working later in life may permit you to continue adding to your retirement savings and delay making withdrawals. For example, if you earn enough to forgo Social Security benefits until after your full retirement age, your eventual benefit will increase by between 5.5% and 8% per year for each year that you wait, depending on the year of your birth. Although you can continue working after age 70, you cannot delay social security benefits past age 70. You can determine your full retirement age at the Social Security Web site (www.ssa.gov) or by calling the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213.

Adding to Your Nest Egg

Depending on the circumstances of your career, working could also enable you to continue adding to your retirement nest egg. If you have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, you may be able to make contributions and continue building retirement assets. If not, consider whether you can fund an IRA. Just remember that after age 70 1/2, you will be required to make withdrawals, known as required minimum distributions (RMDs), from traditional 401(k)s and traditional IRAs. RMDs are not required from Roth IRAs and Roth 401(k)s.

Even if you do not have access to a retirement account, continuing to earn income may help you to delay tapping your personal assets for living expenses, which could help your portfolio last longer in the years to come. Whatever your decision, be sure to apply for Medicare at age 65. In certain circumstances, medical insurance might cost more if you delay your application.

Work doesn’t have to be a chore. You may find opportunities to work part time, on a seasonal basis, or capitalize on a personal interest that you didn’t have time to pursue earlier in life.

© 2013 S&P Capital IQ Financial Communications. All rights reserved.

 

May 20

Have you received a tax refund this year?

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning

Have You Received a Tax Refund This Year?

If you have received a tax refund this year, especially a big one, you may look at it as a form of forced savings. If the money is automatically withheld, you cannot spend it, right? Maybe so. Another way to look at it is that you have lent money to Uncle Sam, and now you got it back interest-free.

There are better way to save than making an interest-free loan to our government. For instance, consider setting an automatic transfer from your checking to a savings, or money market account. The money will be available and you might get some interest. When interest rates go back up, it may add up to a nice little bonus.

If you prefer not to have the money available, consider setting an automatic deposit to an IRA or another investment account (be mindful of the contribution limits). This gets your money working for you right away, and may fit well with your long term planning.

Alternatively, you could pay down credit card debt. Your return would be equal to the rate of interest that the credit card charges you.

Leave a comment if you have other ideas!

Apr 29

Beware of the Mortgage Tax Deduction

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning

Beware of the Mortgage Tax Deduction

Last week I wrote this short piece for the Boston Globe’s website series on tax planning for 2013 (it’s never too early!):

“For many of us, the mortgage tax deduction provides the single largest reduction in taxable income.

With mortgage interest rates continuing to be very attractive, it makes sense to consider refinancing your mortgage, if you have not already done so.

A mortgage refinance has the potential of reducing your payments, and improving your cash flow. It will also reduce reduce your mortgage tax deduction, and therefore increase your taxes due. Make sure to adjust your tax withholding so that you won’t owe taxes (and interest and penalties) as a result of refinancing.

http://www.boston.com/business/2013/04/22/bdc-minimize-uncle-sams-take-gallery/z4za5wNwPJlpIVjoZVAQkJ/story.html?pg=5

Apr 22

High-Yield Bonds: Income Potential at a Price

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

High-Yield Bonds: Income Potential at a Price

High-yield bonds have long been a popular source of diversification for long-term investors who seek to maximize yield and/or total return potential outside of stocks.(1)  High-yield issues often move independently from more conservative U.S. government bonds as well as the stock market.

These bonds — sometimes referred to as “junk” bonds — are a class of corporate debt instruments that are considered below investment grade, due to their issuers’ questionable financial situations. These situations can vary widely — from financially distressed firms to highly leveraged new companies simply aiming to pay off debts.

As the name “high yield” suggests, the competitive yields of these issues have helped attract assets. With yields significantly higher than elsewhere in the bond market, many investors have turned to high-yield bonds for both performance and diversification against stock market risks.

These are valid reasons for investing in high-yield bonds, especially long term. But as you read about what these issues could offer your portfolio, it’s also wise to consider how these bonds earned their nicknames.

The Risk-Return Equation

In exchange for their performance potential, high-yield bonds are very sensitive to all the risk factors affecting the general bond market. Here are some of the most common risks.

  • Credit risk: A high-yield bond’s above-average credit risk is reflected in its low credit ratings. This risk — that the bond’s issuer will default on its financial obligations to investors — means you may lose some or all of the principal amount invested, as well as any outstanding income due.
  • Interest rate risk: High-yield bonds often react more dramatically than other types of debt securities to interest rate risk, or the risk that a bond’s price will drop when general interest rates rise, and vice versa.
  • Liquidity risk: This is the risk that buyers will be few if and when a bond must be sold. This type of risk is exceptionally strong in the high-yield market. There’s usually a narrow market for these issues, partly because some institutional investors (such as big pension funds and life insurance companies) normally can’t place more than 5% of their assets in bonds that are below investment grade.
  • Economic risk: High-yield bonds tend to react strongly to changes in the economy. In a recession, bond defaults often rise and credit quality drops, pushing down total returns on high-yield bonds. This economic sensitivity, combined with other risk factors, can trigger dramatic market upsets. For example, in 2008, the well-publicized downfall of Lehman Brothers squeezed the high-yield market’s tight liquidity even more, driving prices down and yields up.

The risk factors associated with high-yield investing make it imperative to carefully research potential purchases. Be sure to talk to your financial professional before adding them to your portfolio.

Note (1): Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

© 2013 S&P Capital IQ Financial Communications. All rights reserved.

 

Apr 02

Tax Season Dilemna: Invest Money in a Traditional IRA or a Roth IRA?

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Invest in a Roth IRA or a Traditional IRA?

This being tax season, you may want to know, should you put your money in a (traditional) IRA or a Roth IRA?

In a traditional IRA, your contribution will be deductible from your taxable income, and will grow tax-deferred .  Income taxes will be paid when you take distributions at retirement.  The immediate benefit is that a contribution will help you reduce your taxable income, and, therefore, your taxes.  (For the 2012 tax year, you have until April 15 to make that contribution.)

For a Roth IRA, your contribution is not tax deductible .  However, it will grow tax free, and distributions in retirement will not be taxable.  Hence, your retirement income from the Roth would be tax-free.

The traditional IRA helps you save on taxes now , and the Roth IRA helps you save on taxes later .  What then should you do: save on taxes now or save on taxes later?

The answer is entirely about what you expect your taxes to be when you retire.  If you expect your tax rate to be lower in retirement than today, you may want to consider a regular IRA.  That is because, you will be saving a relatively large amount in taxes today, and paying at a relatively low rate in retirement.

On the other hand, should you expect your tax rate to be higher in retirement than today, you may want to consider a Roth.  That is because you would be paying at a low tax rate today, and saving even more taxes later on.

So, you might ask, how can you figure out what your tax rate will be in retirement?  That is a different question altogether!

Check out out other retirement posts:

Is the new tax law an opportunity for Roth conversions

Rolling over your 401(k) to an IRA

7 IRA rules that could save you time and money

Doing the Solo 401k or SEP IRA Dance

Roth 401(k) or not Roth 401(k)

 

 

 

Mar 15

Are your affairs in order?

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning

While it is not  pleasant to think of one’s own passing, having your affairs in order can help ease the burden on friends and family, when the time comes, and can contribute to your own peace of mind knowing that you have done all you can to prepare. There are many factors that should be considered when trying to create an effective and comprehensive estate plan. Some considerations include:

  • Instructions on your own care in sickness
  • Guardians for your minor children should both parents pass
  • Protection from creditors
  • Charitable contributions
  • Continuation of a family business
  • Reducing or eliminating tax
  • Maintaining family harmony
  • Legacy creation and support of future generations

In addition, all these factors should integrate appropriately with your retirement income planning and your investment decisions.

Even if you already have an estate plan in place, you may want to conduct a review. Decisions made years ago may not accurately reflect your current wishes. Estate plans are not for the significantly wealthy alone. If you have children in your care or a business you wish to leave to future generations, it is important that protections and guidance are put in place now and are not put off until your retirement years. It is always a possibility that you may not have the luxury to wait so long.

A poorly executed estate plan, or the lack of one at all, could leave those you most care about suffering needlessly in your absence.  Get ready today to gain control of your estate plan!