8 Reasons you need a Business Valuation

By Jason Berube | Financial Planning

Nov 26

8 Reasons for a Business Valuation

Why you need a Valuation

If you value your business, you should know the value of your business. Every business owner should have an up-to-date business valuation wherever you are in your business’s lifecycle. It is important to know the value of your business sooner rather than later. For a variety of reasons, owners like you will want to have an ongoing understanding of where you stand.  In this post, I will be describing eight of the most common reasons for valuing ongoing businesses, the different valuation methods, and advice for future planning. 

1. Measuring Your Company’s Growth A business valuation delivers a calculated benchmark for comparing your annual growth. Specifically, a valuation report details areas for improvement and what is having a negative impact on your business, such as unstable cash flow, poor systems and procedures and key staff dependencies. Correcting these negative impacts can often translate into opportunities for business and valuation growth.

2. Selling your Business – This is one of the most common reasons for needing a valuation. Knowing your business’ true value and how to increase its Earnings Before Interest and Tax (EBIT) is crucial if you’re planning to sell (as EBIT is a critical factor in valuation). Much like using a valuation to measure your business’ growth, in the case of preparing for a sale you can use the valuation to identify areas for improvement and strategically implement developments to improve your business’ value by the time you plan to sell. Even if you want to sell only a percentage of your company, to get a partner, for example, an owner will need to know the value of the interest being transferred.

What is Earnings Before Interest and Taxes (EBIT)? In accounting and finance, EBIT  is a measure of a company’s profit that includes all income and expenses (operating and non-operating) except interest expenses and income tax expenses.

3. Attracting Investment Opportunities – You never know when an attractive opportunity will present itself. A valuation can be like your business’s resume for potential investors. It provides a snapshot of your business performance in the current economic climate. If you are seeking investors, annual valuations are essential.

4. Planning for expansion – When using a business valuation to measure your business’ growth, you might also decide that it’s the right time to expand your business.  An annual valuation provides an accurate performance benchmark and can make it easier to obtain funding from lenders and financial institutions. Having completed business valuations regularly can help you plan strategically and grow at the right time. 

5. Retirement PlanningMany business owners put their heart and soul (not to mention their life savings) into their business, with the hope that it will one day provide them with a retirement nest egg. If your long-term goal is to retire comfortably on the proceeds of the sale of your company, you need to be prepared.  A periodic update of the value of your company can help you determine if you are on track, and if you are not, what corrective measures to implement.

6. Implementing an EXIT strategy – Every exit plan should align with the owner’s business and personal goals. You have worked a lifetime to build your business into a profitable, well-run operation. A successful exit from a business takes considerable planning. Annual business valuations create a ‘starting point’ for the planning process. No matter what exit strategy you choose (merger/acquisition, sale to employees, etc.), you will need an accurate insight into the value of your share of the business. Regular business valuations will provide a clear picture of your business’s financial position at all times, and help you to achieve the best possible outcome when it is time to ‘exit’.

7. Litigation – If the Principal/Owner of the business is involved in legal proceedings such as a divorce or other lawsuit, the business may need to be valued as part of a property settlement. Divorce and legal disputes can sometimes be difficult topics to discuss. By implementing regular business valuations you’ll have an up-to-date financial record of your business assets which can be useful in legal proceedings such as a divorce or an audit investigation with a government agency.

8. Insurance coverage – Buy-sell arrangements between heirs of the owners’ estate will often include a life insurance requirement so that funds are available in the event of a co-owner’s death. The other co-owners are paid a lump sum benefit, which is then used to buy out the interest of the deceased’s surviving family members. An up-to-date business valuation is vital for this agreement. Insurance companies will ask for it, as your family’s/estate will be paid according to your share of the business value upon your death.

Three Approaches of a Business Valuation

Did you know that there is more than one approach to valuing your business?

There are several business valuation methods. The three most common types of business valuation are the Cost Approach, the Income Approach, and the Market Approach. While methods under each approach rely upon compatible sets of economic principles, the procedural and mathematical details of each business valuation method may differ considerably. 

Businesses are unique and putting a price on a company is complex. Cost, income, and market data must all be considered in order to form an opinion of value. 

The Cost Approach looks at how much it would cost to reconstruct or replace your company (or certain assets that are part of it). When applied to the valuation of owners’ or stockholders’ equity, the cost approach requires a restatement of the balance sheet that substitutes the fair market values of assets and liabilities for their book or depreciated values.

The Income Approach looks at the present value of the future economic benefits of your company. That future is then discounted at a rate commensurate with alternative investments of similar quality and risk.

The Market Approach measures the value of your company, or its assets, by comparing it to similar companies that have been sold or offered for sale. This information is generally compiled from statistics for comparable companies. Where the price represents a majority interest, the higher value is recognized and reflected in a higher price or a premium paid. However, the value of a closely-held company or its stock must reflect its relative illiquidity compared to publicly traded companies. A discount, or a reduction in the indicated marketable value, is made for this factor.

Planning for Your Future

Just like a medical checkup, business valuations should be done regularly since your business value can fluctuate widely depending on market conditions, competition, and financial performance. With so many reasons for knowing the value of your company, having an annually updated company valuation has become a best practice. A good business person knows their position and options at all times so they can make well-informed decisions.

A business is an important asset with very different characteristics from most other financial assets. Handling it correctly to maximize your net worth starts with periodic valuations. It also takes a wealth manager with experience catering to the needs of small business owners.

 

 

About the Author

Jason Berube is an Associate at Insight Financial Strategists. Jason has more than 10 years of experience in financial services. He focuses on helping business owners and entrepreneurs.