Tag Archives for " 401(k) "

Simon Abrams on Unsplash.com
Jun 13

Working into Retirement

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Working into Retirement

The Great Recession has many older Americans considering the prospects of going back to work after retirement or staying in the workforce past their normal retirement age. But working after retirement age is not a new necessity. According to the Social Security Administration, more than 30% of individuals between the ages of 70 and 74 reported income from earnings in 2010, the latest year data are available. Among a younger age group, those between 65 and 69, nearly 49% had income from a job.

Some remain employed for personal reasons, such as a desire for stimulation and social contact; others still want a regular paycheck. Whatever the reason, the decision to continue working into your senior years could potentially have a positive impact on your financial future.

Working later in life may permit you to continue adding to your retirement savings and delay making withdrawals. For example, if you earn enough to forgo Social Security benefits until after your full retirement age, your eventual benefit will increase by between 5.5% and 8% per year for each year that you wait, depending on the year of your birth. Although you can continue working after age 70, you cannot delay social security benefits past age 70. You can determine your full retirement age at the Social Security Web site (www.ssa.gov) or by calling the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213.

Adding to Your Nest Egg

Depending on the circumstances of your career, working could also enable you to continue adding to your retirement nest egg. If you have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, you may be able to make contributions and continue building retirement assets. If not, consider whether you can fund an IRA. Just remember that after age 70 1/2, you will be required to make withdrawals, known as required minimum distributions (RMDs), from traditional 401(k)s and traditional IRAs. RMDs are not required from Roth IRAs and Roth 401(k)s.

Even if you do not have access to a retirement account, continuing to earn income may help you to delay tapping your personal assets for living expenses, which could help your portfolio last longer in the years to come. Whatever your decision, be sure to apply for Medicare at age 65. In certain circumstances, medical insurance might cost more if you delay your application.

Work doesn’t have to be a chore. You may find opportunities to work part time, on a seasonal basis, or capitalize on a personal interest that you didn’t have time to pursue earlier in life.

© 2013 S&P Capital IQ Financial Communications. All rights reserved.

 

Steve Johnson on Unsplash.com
Jun 03

What Fees Are Associated With Your Retirement Plan?

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Investment Planning , Retirement Planning

What Fees Are Associated With Your Retirement Plan?

There’s a little secret associated with your workplace -sponsored retirement plan.  Usually that is a 401k. However, it can also be a 403b, a 457, or a SIMPLE IRA. Most participants think their plan is free – That it doesn’t cost them anything to join, contribute, and invest.  Unfortunately, that’s not entirely true.

While employees typically aren’t charged any out-of-pocket costs to participate in their plans, participants do pay expenses, many of which are difficult to find and even more difficult to calculate. New regulations from the Department of Labor (DOL), which oversees qualified workplace retirement plans, should make it easier for participants to locate and comprehend how much they are paying for the services and benefits they receive.

Here’s a summary of the information you should receive.

  1. Investment-related information, including information on each investment’s performance, expense ratios, and fees charged directly to participant accounts. These fees and expenses are typically deducted from your investment returns before the returns (loss or gain) are posted to your account. Previously, they were not itemized on your statement.
  2. Plan administrative expenses, including an explanation of fees or expenses not included in the investment fees charged to the participant. These charges can include legal, recordkeeping, or consulting expenses.
  3. Individual participant expenses, which details fees charged for services such as loans and investment advice. The new disclosure would also alert participants to charges for any redemption or transfer fees.
  4. General plan information, including information regarding the investments in the plan and the participant’s ability to manage their investments. Most of this information is already included in a document called the Summary Plan Description (SPD). Your plan was required to send you an SPD once every five years, now they must send one annually.

These regulations have been hailed by many industry experts as a much-needed step toward helping participants better understand investing in their company-sponsored retirement plans. Why should you take the time to learn more about fees? One very important reason: Understanding expenses could save you thousands of dollars over the long term.

While fees shouldn’t be your only determinant when selecting investments, costs should be a key consideration of any potential investment opportunity. For example, consider two similar mutual funds. Fund A has an expense ratio of 0.99%, while Fund B has an expense ratio of 1.34%. At first look, a difference of 0.35% doesn’t seem like a big deal. Over time, however, that small sum can add up, as the table below demonstrates.

Expense ratio

Initial investment Annual return Balance after 20 years

Expenses paid to the fund

Fund A

0.99% $100,000 7% $317,462 $37,244
Fund B 1.34% $100,000 7% $296,001

$48,405

Over this 20-year time period, Fund B was $11,161 more expensive than Fund A. You can perform actual fund-to-fund comparisons for your investments using the FINRA Fund Analyzer.

If you have questions about the fees charged by the investments available through your workplace retirement plan, speak to your plan administrator or your financial professional.

 

Note:   Investments are not FDIC-insured, nor are they deposits of or guaranteed by a bank or any other entity, so you may lose money. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. For more complete information about any mutual fund, including risk, charges, and expenses, please obtain a prospectus. Please read the prospectus carefully before you invest. Call the appropriate mutual fund company for the most recent month-end performance results. Current performance may be lower or higher than the hypothetical performance data quoted. The hypothetical data quoted is for illustrative purposes only and is not indicative of the performance of any actual investments. Investment return and principal value will fluctuate; and shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost.