Category Archives for "Retirement Planning"

Mar 03

Roth IRA or Traditional IRA?

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

stockmonkeys.comAs a Financial Planner, I often get asked if people should save money in a Traditional IRA or a Roth IRA. In a Traditional IRA, we contribute money on a pre-tax basis (i.e. we do not pay taxes on our IRA contributions), we let it grow tax-deferred, and we pay taxes when we withdraw the money in retirement. In a Roth IRA, we contribute after-tax money, we let it grow tax-free and we pay no taxes when we withdraw the money in retirement.

That last point (“we pay no taxes when we withdraw the money in retirement”) is, of course, the one that gets our attention. We don’t like paying taxes, and the thought that we could have tax-free income in retirement is really motivating, so much so, that, sometimes, it can be the only thing we focus on.

However, the Traditional IRA vs Roth IRA story is not quite that straightforward.

The reality is that we WILL pay taxes whether it is for a Roth IRA or a Traditional IRA. With the Traditional IRA tax deduction, we reduce taxes at contribution, and we pay taxes when we withdraw the money. With a Roth IRA, we pay taxes before we contribute the money. At the risk of disappointing many readers, allow me to repeat: the Roth IRA is NOT tax-free, it is taxed differently.

When you do the math you will find that if you 1) invest in the same way in a Roth IRA vs IRA, and 2) are taxed at the same rate on your Roth IRA contribution today, as on your Traditional IRA withdrawals at retirement, you will end up with the exact same amount of money to spend in retirement. Call us: we will show you the math.

So which one is best? The answer is that it depends.

In general, it makes sense to invest through a Roth IRA when we think that our tax rate in retirement will be equal to or higher than our current tax rate. If we think that our tax rate in retirement will be equal or lower than our current tax rate it makes better sense to invest through a Regular IRA.

How then should you decide?

It depends on your situation.

For instance, if you are at the peak of your earnings, and you can calculate that your income in retirement will be significantly less than it is today, a Traditional IRA calculator will tell you that you will save tax money immediately. Since you expect to be in a lower tax bracket at retirement, you will end up paying less taxes.

If you are currently a low earner, and expect to have higher income in retirement than you have now, a Roth IRA calculator will thell you that your cost in taxes will be relatively low, and you will not pay any more when you retire.

Because there are many phases in our working life, there are times when it makes better sense to invest through a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k), and other times when it makes better sense to invest through a Traditional IRA or a Traditional 401(k). Conversely, there will be times in our retired life when it will make better sense to withdraw from a Roth IRA, and others when it will make better sense to withdraw from a Traditional IRA.

There are some other constraints. For instance, the traditional IRA max contribution is significantly lower than the 401(k). In addition, if your income is above the Traditional IRA income limits or the Roth IRA limit you may not be able to contribute.

It is about balance and careful financial planning. In the right circumstances, the proper balance between Roth and Traditional IRAs could save you a significant tax bill. In my opinion, it justifies a consultation with a professional financial planner.

 

Check out out other retirement posts:

Is the new tax law an opportunity for Roth conversions

Rolling over your 401(k) to an IRA

7 IRA rules that could save you time and money

Doing the Solo 401k or SEP IRA Dance

Tax season dilemna: invest in a Traditional or a Roth IRA

Roth 401(k) or not Roth 401(k)

 

 

Sep 16

Long Term Care Considerations for Retirement Planning

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Long Term Care Considerations for Retirement Planning

Long Term Care is no one’s favorite topic. However, most of us will require some form of long term care at some point in time, when we are no longer able to do everything for ourselves that we used to . Hence LTC should be addressed in a financial plan or a retirement plan.

For many of us LTC is the most unpredictable and least planned for expense of  retirement . We just don’t have a very good way to predict how much long term care we will need, when we will need it, and how much it will cost. Paradoxically, this is exactly why planning is needed as part of normal financial or retirement planning.

According to the Federal Government, Long Term Care is the range of services and

Long Term Care

support you will need to meet health and personal care needs over a long period of time. LTC is not medical care , but rather assistance with the basic personal tasks of everyday life.

According to Genworth, a prominent provider of Long Term Care Insurance, the median annual cost in 2013 for a semi-private room in a nursing home is $75,405 per year. Based on my experience LTC costs in Massachusetts are much higher than that.

Who Pays for Long Term Care?

People often assume that Medicare or Medigap (the supplemental coverage for Medicare), or even regular health insurance will absorb the cost of their Long Term Care expense. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

In general, most people who need Long Term Care pay for it out of their own assets. Once there is no money left, Medicaid will usually take over. Take note that Medicaid is a government welfare program . This approach works best for people who have enough assets to cover any foreseeable circumstance, or people who just don’t have enough assets worth protecting.

Long Term Care Insurance

That’s why Long Term Care insurance is an important part of a financial plan . For those who have it, long term care insurance will pay for your Long Term Care expenses, up to the limit of the policy. This is a way to preserve assets for other purposes, including for your legacy.

From a tax standpoint, it is worth noting that the premiums for most classical LTC policies available today are deductible from taxable income within the limits specified by the IRS. In addition, up to certain limits, benefits are not taxed as income. Take this favorable tax treatment as a sign that Uncle Sam would like to encourage you to be covered!

So, Long Term Care insurance helps pay for long term care expenses , LTC insurance helps preserve your assets and your legacy, and LTC insurance is potentially tax deductible. So why are so many people resistant to traditional Long Term Care insurance?

First, it is expensive. Although, we might point out that the cost of insurance is normally much less than the cost of Long Term Care itself.

Second, the possibility that the insurance policy may not be used, for instance if death happens suddenly, is enough to stop many people from acquiring Long Term Care insurance. The thought of paying premiums for years, and not collecting a benefit would make the insurance a waste. For people who feel like that, there are alternatives.

Don’t Waste the Premiums

There are LTC insurance products that allow you to “not waste the premiums” . They allow you to get Long Term Care coverage if needed, and have an opportunity to get the premium paid back in case the Long Term Care benefit is not used.

Although, the details of these products is beyond the scope of this post, suffice it to say, that these alternatives can provide a lot of flexibility in a financial plan.

These three approaches (pay out of assets, traditional long term care insurance, and “not waste the premium” alternatives) all offer different benefits and should be matched to the correct circumstance and individual preference. If you need to figure out which option works best for you, get help from your financial planner.

Check our other posts on Long Term Care:

Planning For Long Term Care

Should You Cancel Long Term Care Insurance

Aug 26

Investing in Aggressive Growth Funds

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Investing in Aggressive Growth Funds

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/dd/NYSE_Building.JPG/320px-NYSE_Building.JPG

Chances are your retirement plan offers one or more stock funds to choose from. If it is consistent with your investment objectives and your investment risk tolerance, you may want to consider investing a portion of your plan in an aggressive growth fund.

Risks and Rewards

Aggressive growth funds, as the name indicates, are stock funds that are growth-oriented. Included in aggressive growth funds are several options like “small-cap” funds, “emerging market” funds, as well as various kinds of international funds. Aggressive growth funds tend to invest in smaller, fast-moving companies in developing sectors with the potential for rapid growth (hence the name), such as high-tech or biotechnology. They may also invest in equities that have fallen out of favor on Wall Street, but appear ready for a comeback.

Because they invest in companies that are often less known and not as established as the companies that make up the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), aggressive growth funds tend to exhibit volatile behavior.  For instance, when the market goes down, an aggressive growth fund may go down more than the DJIA.  Conversely, when the market goes up, aggressive growth funds often go up more. The goal of aggressive growth funds is to achieve higher returns than other stock funds.

Aggressive growth funds are best suited  for long-term investors with the intestinal fortitude to bear the market’s worst downturns while seeking the strongest returns.  For example, an investor may want to allocate some of his or her portfolio to aggressive growth funds to potentially accumulate as much as possible over a long time horizon. These funds may be especially suitable for younger investors with 25, 30, or 35 years until retirement.

Don’t Forget Diversification

Regardless of how aggressively you would like to invest, keep in mind the crucial benefits of allocating your money across investments that behave differently.

If you invest in an aggressive growth fund, you may want to balance its inherent risk with investments that have different risk characteristics such as growth and income funds, bond funds, and money market funds.

A financial planner can help you determine the investment allocation that’s best suited for you and your goals.

Jul 17

Should you buy stocks now?

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Should you buy stocks now?

buy stocks now or follow your long term financial plan?If you are like many investors, you may have a large chunk of your brokerage account or IRAs in money market or short term treasury, and your 401(k) in a Stable Value Fund. The DJIA and S&P500 have been reaching new highs in the past few weeks, and, naturally, investors are wondering: is it time to get back into the market, is it time to buy stocks now or stock mutual funds?
A recent Dalbar study has shown that the average investor in US stocks and stock mutual funds earned an average return of 4.25% per year over the past 20 years, while the S&P500 stock index generated an average 8.21% return over the same period. In other words the average equity investor underperforms the financial markets by almost 4%. This large difference is mostly due to people trying unsuccessfully to time the market.
A more sensible  approach is to consider the intended use of the money sitting in money market. Is it for a short term purpose, such as next September’s college tuition or buying a car? If so, the funds should probably stay in money market. Is it for a long term goal, such as retirement or saving to buy a house on the beach in 10 years? Then, buying stocks may be something to consider.
As an investor, you should have a long term plan that allocates your money to goals and to investments.  Whether to buy stocks now or not to buy stocks now should not depend upon how well the market is doing. If you need a plan, or you need to update one, speak with your Financial Planner. If you need a planner, contact us or the Financial Planning Association of Massachusetts.
Simon Abrams on Unsplash.com
Jun 13

Working into Retirement

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Working into Retirement

The Great Recession has many older Americans considering the prospects of going back to work after retirement or staying in the workforce past their normal retirement age. But working after retirement age is not a new necessity. According to the Social Security Administration, more than 30% of individuals between the ages of 70 and 74 reported income from earnings in 2010, the latest year data are available. Among a younger age group, those between 65 and 69, nearly 49% had income from a job.

Some remain employed for personal reasons, such as a desire for stimulation and social contact; others still want a regular paycheck. Whatever the reason, the decision to continue working into your senior years could potentially have a positive impact on your financial future.

Working later in life may permit you to continue adding to your retirement savings and delay making withdrawals. For example, if you earn enough to forgo Social Security benefits until after your full retirement age, your eventual benefit will increase by between 5.5% and 8% per year for each year that you wait, depending on the year of your birth. Although you can continue working after age 70, you cannot delay social security benefits past age 70. You can determine your full retirement age at the Social Security Web site (www.ssa.gov) or by calling the Social Security Administration at 1-800-772-1213.

Adding to Your Nest Egg

Depending on the circumstances of your career, working could also enable you to continue adding to your retirement nest egg. If you have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, you may be able to make contributions and continue building retirement assets. If not, consider whether you can fund an IRA. Just remember that after age 70 1/2, you will be required to make withdrawals, known as required minimum distributions (RMDs), from traditional 401(k)s and traditional IRAs. RMDs are not required from Roth IRAs and Roth 401(k)s.

Even if you do not have access to a retirement account, continuing to earn income may help you to delay tapping your personal assets for living expenses, which could help your portfolio last longer in the years to come. Whatever your decision, be sure to apply for Medicare at age 65. In certain circumstances, medical insurance might cost more if you delay your application.

Work doesn’t have to be a chore. You may find opportunities to work part time, on a seasonal basis, or capitalize on a personal interest that you didn’t have time to pursue earlier in life.

© 2013 S&P Capital IQ Financial Communications. All rights reserved.

 

Steve Johnson on Unsplash.com
Jun 03

What Fees Are Associated With Your Retirement Plan?

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Investment Planning , Retirement Planning

What Fees Are Associated With Your Retirement Plan?

There’s a little secret associated with your workplace -sponsored retirement plan.  Usually that is a 401k. However, it can also be a 403b, a 457, or a SIMPLE IRA. Most participants think their plan is free – That it doesn’t cost them anything to join, contribute, and invest.  Unfortunately, that’s not entirely true.

While employees typically aren’t charged any out-of-pocket costs to participate in their plans, participants do pay expenses, many of which are difficult to find and even more difficult to calculate. New regulations from the Department of Labor (DOL), which oversees qualified workplace retirement plans, should make it easier for participants to locate and comprehend how much they are paying for the services and benefits they receive.

Here’s a summary of the information you should receive.

  1. Investment-related information, including information on each investment’s performance, expense ratios, and fees charged directly to participant accounts. These fees and expenses are typically deducted from your investment returns before the returns (loss or gain) are posted to your account. Previously, they were not itemized on your statement.
  2. Plan administrative expenses, including an explanation of fees or expenses not included in the investment fees charged to the participant. These charges can include legal, recordkeeping, or consulting expenses.
  3. Individual participant expenses, which details fees charged for services such as loans and investment advice. The new disclosure would also alert participants to charges for any redemption or transfer fees.
  4. General plan information, including information regarding the investments in the plan and the participant’s ability to manage their investments. Most of this information is already included in a document called the Summary Plan Description (SPD). Your plan was required to send you an SPD once every five years, now they must send one annually.

These regulations have been hailed by many industry experts as a much-needed step toward helping participants better understand investing in their company-sponsored retirement plans. Why should you take the time to learn more about fees? One very important reason: Understanding expenses could save you thousands of dollars over the long term.

While fees shouldn’t be your only determinant when selecting investments, costs should be a key consideration of any potential investment opportunity. For example, consider two similar mutual funds. Fund A has an expense ratio of 0.99%, while Fund B has an expense ratio of 1.34%. At first look, a difference of 0.35% doesn’t seem like a big deal. Over time, however, that small sum can add up, as the table below demonstrates.

Expense ratio

Initial investment Annual return Balance after 20 years

Expenses paid to the fund

Fund A

0.99% $100,000 7% $317,462 $37,244
Fund B 1.34% $100,000 7% $296,001

$48,405

Over this 20-year time period, Fund B was $11,161 more expensive than Fund A. You can perform actual fund-to-fund comparisons for your investments using the FINRA Fund Analyzer.

If you have questions about the fees charged by the investments available through your workplace retirement plan, speak to your plan administrator or your financial professional.

 

Note:   Investments are not FDIC-insured, nor are they deposits of or guaranteed by a bank or any other entity, so you may lose money. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. For more complete information about any mutual fund, including risk, charges, and expenses, please obtain a prospectus. Please read the prospectus carefully before you invest. Call the appropriate mutual fund company for the most recent month-end performance results. Current performance may be lower or higher than the hypothetical performance data quoted. The hypothetical data quoted is for illustrative purposes only and is not indicative of the performance of any actual investments. Investment return and principal value will fluctuate; and shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost.

 

May 12

Marriage and Building Wealth: Finding a Happy Balance

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Marriage and Building Wealth: Finding a Happy Balance

Marriage affects your finances in many ways, including your ability to build wealth, plan for retirement, plan your estate, and capitalize on tax and insurance-related benefits. Here are some considerations to keep in mind if you are thinking of getting married or have just tied the knot.

Building wealth

If both you and your spouse are employed, two salaries can be a considerable benefit in building long-term wealth. For example, if both of you have access to employer-sponsored retirement plans, your joint contributions are double the individual maximums ($17,500 for 2013). Similarly, a working couple may be able to pay a mortgage more easily than a single person can, which may make it possible for a couple to apply a portion of their combined paychecks for family savings or investments.

Retirement benefits

Some (but not all) pensions provide benefits to widows or widowers following a pensioner’s death. When participating in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, married workers are required to name their spouse as beneficiary unless the spouse waives this right in writing. Qualifying widows or widowers may collect Social Security benefits up to a maximum of 50% of the benefit earned by a deceased spouse.

Estate planning

Married couples may transfer real estate and personal property to a surviving spouse with no federal gift or estate tax consequences until the survivor dies. But surviving spouses do not automatically inherit all assets. Couples who desire to structure their estates in such a way that each spouse is the sole beneficiary of the other need to create wills or other estate planning documents to ensure that their wishes are realized. In the absence of a will, state laws governing disposition of an estate take effect. Also, certain types of trusts, such as QTIP trusts and marital deduction trusts, are restricted to married couples.

Tax planning

When filing federal income taxes, filing jointly typically results in lower tax payments when compared with filing separately.

Debt management

In certain circumstances, creditors may be able to attach marital or community property to satisfy the debts of one spouse. Couples wishing to guard against this practice may do so with a prenuptial agreement.

The opportunity to go through life with a loving partner may be the greatest benefit of a successful marriage. That said, there are financial and legal benefits that you may want to explore with your beloved.

 

Apr 22

High-Yield Bonds: Income Potential at a Price

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

High-Yield Bonds: Income Potential at a Price

High-yield bonds have long been a popular source of diversification for long-term investors who seek to maximize yield and/or total return potential outside of stocks.(1)  High-yield issues often move independently from more conservative U.S. government bonds as well as the stock market.

These bonds — sometimes referred to as “junk” bonds — are a class of corporate debt instruments that are considered below investment grade, due to their issuers’ questionable financial situations. These situations can vary widely — from financially distressed firms to highly leveraged new companies simply aiming to pay off debts.

As the name “high yield” suggests, the competitive yields of these issues have helped attract assets. With yields significantly higher than elsewhere in the bond market, many investors have turned to high-yield bonds for both performance and diversification against stock market risks.

These are valid reasons for investing in high-yield bonds, especially long term. But as you read about what these issues could offer your portfolio, it’s also wise to consider how these bonds earned their nicknames.

The Risk-Return Equation

In exchange for their performance potential, high-yield bonds are very sensitive to all the risk factors affecting the general bond market. Here are some of the most common risks.

  • Credit risk: A high-yield bond’s above-average credit risk is reflected in its low credit ratings. This risk — that the bond’s issuer will default on its financial obligations to investors — means you may lose some or all of the principal amount invested, as well as any outstanding income due.
  • Interest rate risk: High-yield bonds often react more dramatically than other types of debt securities to interest rate risk, or the risk that a bond’s price will drop when general interest rates rise, and vice versa.
  • Liquidity risk: This is the risk that buyers will be few if and when a bond must be sold. This type of risk is exceptionally strong in the high-yield market. There’s usually a narrow market for these issues, partly because some institutional investors (such as big pension funds and life insurance companies) normally can’t place more than 5% of their assets in bonds that are below investment grade.
  • Economic risk: High-yield bonds tend to react strongly to changes in the economy. In a recession, bond defaults often rise and credit quality drops, pushing down total returns on high-yield bonds. This economic sensitivity, combined with other risk factors, can trigger dramatic market upsets. For example, in 2008, the well-publicized downfall of Lehman Brothers squeezed the high-yield market’s tight liquidity even more, driving prices down and yields up.

The risk factors associated with high-yield investing make it imperative to carefully research potential purchases. Be sure to talk to your financial professional before adding them to your portfolio.

Note (1): Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

© 2013 S&P Capital IQ Financial Communications. All rights reserved.

 

Apr 02

Tax Season Dilemna: Invest Money in a Traditional IRA or a Roth IRA?

By Chris Chen CFP | Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Invest in a Roth IRA or a Traditional IRA?

This being tax season, you may want to know, should you put your money in a (traditional) IRA or a Roth IRA?

In a traditional IRA, your contribution will be deductible from your taxable income, and will grow tax-deferred .  Income taxes will be paid when you take distributions at retirement.  The immediate benefit is that a contribution will help you reduce your taxable income, and, therefore, your taxes.  (For the 2012 tax year, you have until April 15 to make that contribution.)

For a Roth IRA, your contribution is not tax deductible .  However, it will grow tax free, and distributions in retirement will not be taxable.  Hence, your retirement income from the Roth would be tax-free.

The traditional IRA helps you save on taxes now , and the Roth IRA helps you save on taxes later .  What then should you do: save on taxes now or save on taxes later?

The answer is entirely about what you expect your taxes to be when you retire.  If you expect your tax rate to be lower in retirement than today, you may want to consider a regular IRA.  That is because, you will be saving a relatively large amount in taxes today, and paying at a relatively low rate in retirement.

On the other hand, should you expect your tax rate to be higher in retirement than today, you may want to consider a Roth.  That is because you would be paying at a low tax rate today, and saving even more taxes later on.

So, you might ask, how can you figure out what your tax rate will be in retirement?  That is a different question altogether!

Check out out other retirement posts:

Is the new tax law an opportunity for Roth conversions

Rolling over your 401(k) to an IRA

7 IRA rules that could save you time and money

Doing the Solo 401k or SEP IRA Dance

Roth 401(k) or not Roth 401(k)

 

 

 

Feb 22

Alice in Wonderland and financial planning

By Chris Chen CFP | Divorce Planning , Financial Planning , Retirement Planning

Alice in Wonderland and Financial Planning

Those who have read Alice in Wonderland may know the Cheshire Cat as a mysterious and baffling being.  The Cat often makes some very good points, although rarely in a very helpful way.  One is in the picture below.  Unfortunately,  I took it with my phone, and the  text is a little blurry.  So I re-wrote it.

Financial Planning

“Would you tell me please, which way I ought to go from here”

“That depends a great deal on where you want to go” said the Cat.

“I don’t much care where ___” said Alice.

“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat

“__ so long as I get somewhere,” Alice added as an explanation.

“Oh, you’re sure to do that,” said  the Cat, “if only you walk long enough.”

If you are reading this blog post, chances are you are interested in financial planning.  Alice has taken the first step: she knows she would like to get somewhere, she realizes that she does not know how to, and she has asked for advice.

Hopefully in real life you won’t have to rely on the Cheshire Cat for advice, or any Cat for that matter!  Do remember though: if you walk long enough, you will eventually get somewhere.

Will it be where you want to?